Glossary

A.C.: alternating current. Alternating current is an electric current which periodically reverses direction, in contrast to direct current which flows only in one direction. Alternating current is the form in which electric power is delivered to businesses and residences; and it is the form of electrical energy that consumers typically use when they plug kitchen appliances, televisions, fans, and electric lamps into a wall socket.

black tank/water: An RV black water holding tank stores water and waste from flush style RV toilets.

boondocking: [Origin of boondock: 1910s, Tagalog bundok (“mountain”), adopted by American troops stationed in the Philippines, and reinforced or re-adopted during World War II and continued afterwards. Popularly used by RVers. The noun is generally plural, "boondocks," referring to a brushy rural or remote area. Slang term is "boonies."] RV boondocking generally refers to camping in a rural or remote area without hook-ups (electricity, water, sewer) in a self-contained or self-sufficient manner.

class A RV:

class B RV:

class C RV:

coach:

composting toilet:

D.C.: direct current. Direct current always flows in the same direction between the positive and negative terminals of a battery. Batteries, fuel cells, and solar cells all produce direct current.

dispersed camping:

dry camping:

fresh water tank: An RV fresh water holding tank stores only potable water for drinking. The type of hose used to fill this tank needs to be specially developed for drinking water use. They are usually white but can be other colors, as well. They do not contain lead or other toxic substances.

gray tank/water: An RV gray water holding tank stores water from sinks and showers.

house bank:

inverter:

L.E.D. bulbs/lights:

macerater:

potable water: (POH-tuh-bull) Potable water is suitable for drinking.

RV: recreational vehicle.

shore power:

skoolie: a school bus that has been converted into a recreational vehicle.

tuff: a pinkish-tan rock which forms from volcanic ash flows that consolidate into thick layers of soft rock.

washboard:


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